The Solar Power Tree – An Intervention by Indian Scientist aimed at Utilizing Minimum Land to Harness Maximum Solar Energy

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CSIR-CMERI,Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute (CSIR-CMERI), Durgapur, West Bengal has designed and developed a “Solar Power Tree” to harness maximum solar energy utilising minimum land – In general, it requires about 3.5 acres of land to produce 1 MW of solar power. For any state in the country to survive on green energy there will be requirement of thousands of acres of land. The acquisition of land is a major issue for private sector industry. Solar Power Tree addresses the biggest hurdle of land requirements to gainfully utilise solar power.

Solar Power Tree is an intervention against land constraints. It harnesses solar energy for producing electricity with an innovative vertical arrangement of solar cells. It thus reduces the requirement of land while keeping the land character intact. It even enables utilisation of the cultivable land for solar energy harnessing along with farming at the same time.

The Salient Features of the Solar Power Tree are:

  • It takes much less land of only 4 sq ft for a 5 kW Solar Power Tree as compared to 400 sq ft of land required in case of the conventional Solar Photovoltaic layout;
  • It holds the panels at a higher height – thus gets more sun (by 1 hour) in a day in comparison to that in conventional layout on ground; Thus, it is possible to harness 10-15% more power;
  • It is facilitated with water sprinkler at the top for self-cleaning of panels;
  • The paddy lands or agro-gardens or roads can be utilized for production of green power keeping land scape/cultivation unaltered;
  • Applicable for both rural and urban areas.

In future, it is possible to harness 10% more power by rotating panel direction twice in a day by using a module that aligns itself with the movement of sun. Also, aesthetic aspects would be incorporated in the design of solar tree to landscape the land.

The Specifications for 5 KW Solar Power TREE are:

  • Peak Power: 5KW;
  • Full Load Capacity: 60% of the Peak;
  • Battery Back Up: 2 hrs. (Full load);
  • Cost: INR 5 Lakh;
  • Footprint: 4 sq. ft.;
  • Arial Span: 25 ft. Dia,
  • Warranty: Panel: 25 Years.

The technology developed under the leadership of Dr. SN Maity, Chief Scientist, CSIRCMERI, has been licensed to: M/s Vibes Solar Solution India LLP, Kolkata. The process is under way to license the technology to more companies.

For further details, please contact: Dr. SN Maity Chief Scientist, CSIR-CMERI e-mail: drsnmaity@yahoo.com

Watch “Solar Power Tree” news covered by “Voice of America”

Reference :  CSIR Press Release

Mitticool – Inspiring story of craftsman who built Refrigerator without electricity

Born in the Prajapati family, originally belonging to the village Nichimandal of Morbi, Rajkot, Mansukhbhai had exposure to the clay tradition since childhood, as this was his family’s traditional profession. He used to load clay from the ponds and fields on the donkey and ferry it to his place. Other than this, his contribution was limited as he was not much interested in the pottery work.

Having gained a sound knowledge while working in the pottery unit, the desire to start an enterprise of his own started to grow in Mansukhbhais mind. During his childhood, he saw earthen pans/hot plates (locally termed as Kaladi/Tavdi) being manufactured manually on the potters wheel (locally termed as Chhakdo). Using this, one person can only make about 100 units per day. He had seen roof tiles being manufactured in large quantity on hand press, which made him think why cannot earthen pans be made the same way?

In 1988, he left his job and took a loan of Rs 30,000 from a money lender to start his own earthen plate manufacturing factory. He purchased a small piece of land for the factory, dyes and presses, soil mixing machine, electric potters wheel and other scrap objects. Then he modified the roof tile making hand press and developed a hand press machine having capacity to produce 700 earthen pans per day.

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In the fateful earthquake of January 2001, Mansukhbhai suffered huge loss, as most of his stock got broken. He distributed the stock that escaped the quake to the quake affected people of Kutch. In February 2001, Sandesh Gujarati Daily had a photo feature on the earthquake where at one place it showed a broken water filter of Mansukhbhai with the caption the broken fridge of poor.

This caption ignited a thought in him to work on a rural fridge that did not need electricity and could be used by masses. Though he started thinking about it after the Gujarat earthquake of 2001, it was 2002 when he actually started his work. Almost the same time, Mansukhbhai came into the contact of Gujarat Grass-roots Innovation Augmentation Network (GIAN), Ahmedabad. After a painstaking journey of three years during which he tested all sorts of soils and fridge designs, he finally came out with Mitticool fridge in 2005. A civil engineer saw the fridge and looking at its applications gave him the order of 100 pieces and an advance of Rs. 2 lakh.

Check Address and Contact Number of Mitticool at http://con.greenecosystem.in/clay-products/mitti-cool-clay-refrigerator-cooker.html

Watch Story of Mansukhabhai Prajapati, covered in leading national news channel, NDTV.

Harmful effects of plastic on cows and PM Narendra Modi’s message to save Cows

We everyone knows how hazardous plastic is for the environment.  Whenever we throws something like paper, food etc in the environment, there are some bacteria which grows on it, and covert this food, papers into something which mixes into the environment, some turning into useful for growing of trees, we call those items as biodegradable items. Biodegradable items are capable of being decomposed by bacteria or other living organisms and thereby avoiding pollution.

Whereas Plastic is a “Non-Biodegradable” item. Non-biodegradable waste is a type of waste that can not be broken down into its base compounds by micro-organisms, air, moisture or soil in a reasonable amount of time. Non-biodegradable waste is an environmental concern, as it threatens to overwhelm landfills and create disposal problems.

Img credit : http://vspca.org
Img credit : http://vspca.org

In past VSPCA (Visakha Society for Protection and Care of Animals), through their “Plastic Cow Project” has done extensive reasearch on the impacts of plastic on the street cows, and how they die a painful death due to having plastic in their stomach. VSPCA also tried to rescue those cows and do the operations on them to get the plastic removed. You can find mode details about the “Plastic Cow Project” as VSPCA website.

In 2013 , after petition from some Animal welfare organisation, Honerable Supreme court of India has said that “Plastic waste a ticking time bomb in India” and had directed the State Governments to issue appropriate directions prohibiting the use, sale and disposal of plastic bags in all municipalities and municipal corporations within their territory.

Preventing Cows from eating plastic is true Gau-Sewa: PM Narendra Modi
Preventing Cows from eating plastic is true Gau-Sewa: PM Narendra Modi

Last year ( 2015 ) Union Environment Minister Parkash Javadekar had said that every dead cow contains not less than 30 kgs of plastic. While talking in a town-hall meeting recently, Honorable Prime Minister Shri. Narendra Modi said that preventing cows from eating the plastic is the only way to save cows because more cows dies due to plastic than any other reason.

Now, as PM Modi has again highlighted the use of plastic and its harmful effects on environment and health and living of cows,Green Ecosystem vows to do all & everything we can do to suport PM’s statement and avoid use of plastic to save the environment & cows. We look forward for similar help from our readers and well wishers.

Reference :

http://southasia.oneworld.net – Plastic waste a ticking time bomb in India: Supreme Court

Click to access wc15412p-2014_11_18.pdf


ndtv.com – 30 Kg Plastic Can Be Found in Every Dead Cow in India, Says Union Environment Minister

Radhika Anand, along with Indian Army Planted more than one lakh twenty thousand trees in a year

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52-year-old Radhika Anand, resident of Delhi and a former Air Force Officer’s daughter, has planted more than one lakh twenty thousand saplings in a single year in partnership with the Indian Army. The Trees included in these are mango, tamarind, blackberry, and jackfruit trees which were planted in and around across Maharashtra, Rajasthan, and North India Army Formations. The cost to plant and nurture the tree for its entire life is just 15 Rupees as per her.

Radhika Anand is also a Founder & CEO of Plantology, which felicitates a mass movement amongst young minds which has subsequently manifested in productive socio-ecomomic welfare outcomes.

Plantology’s latest initiative is “Mission Fal-Van, Fruit for All” which is a movement towords creating more green cover and oxygen for our future generations and food for all species existing on plant earth. Mission “Fal Van” aims to plant 50,000 fruit trees per year.

You may contact Plantology at their website http://www.plantologyindia.com.

Satyamev Jayate – Water – Every drop counts, An Episode on Water Conservation

satyamev-jayate

Satyamev Jayate (English: Truth Alone Prevails) is an Indian television talk show aired on various channels within Star Network along with Doordarshan’s DD National. It Aired an episode on Water Conservation “Water – Every drop counts”.

Watch the complete Episode on Youtube.

Meet the “Mango Man” who grows more than 300 varieties of mangoes on single tree – PadmaShri Haji Kalimullah Khan from Lucknow, India

Mango Man

Haji Kalimullah Khan from Malihabad, Lucknow, India, also called as ‘Mango Man’ has been awarded the Padma Shri in 2008 for his rare technique of growing more than 300 varieties of mangoes of different shapes, sizes and hues on one tree.

Khan’s prized tree is about 100 years old on which he started work in 1987 to develop the craft of growing different varieties on one tree. Using the asexual propagation technique of grafting, he has developed several new varieties of mangoes, some of which has been named after his family members who also were mango growers and some named after celebrities such as Akhilesh Yadav, Sachin Tendulkar, Sonia Gandhi and Aishwarya Rai. Anarkali, a variety of mango developed by him is reported to have two different skins and two different layers of pulp, each having a different taste. Every fruit on this tree has a tiny tin label of identification on its pale green pedicle.

No wonder the tree has been put together with great care. So, the Alphonsos have come all the way from Maharashtra’s Ratnagiri district, the Langras from Bihar, the Himsagars from West Bengal and the Bangan-pallis from Andhra Pradesh. He knows all eyes are on the tree. Hence the constant striving for perfection. “I am angootha-thek (illiterate),” he says, “but I do have something to contribute.”

“Kaleemullah is an amazing man,” grants an official of the Uttar Pradesh government’s directorate of horticulture and food processing.

A local Hindi-language journalist acquiesces: “It’s unbelievable. Kaleemullah can grow two or three varieties of mangoes on the same stalk. What’s more, he recognises every single variety from the way it looks and smells.”

Listen the complete story from Haji Kalimullah Khan own.

You may contact  “Padam Shree Haji Kalimullah Khan” at his Mobile No : +91 9936653445 and address Malihabad, Lucknow, from state Uttar Pradesh in India. His website is http://hajikaleemullahkhan.in

Top 5 Wildlife and Environment Film makers of India

mike pandey
mike pandey
Image Courtesy : Facebook Page

Mike Pandey

Mike Pandey is an Indian film maker specializing in films about wildlife and the environment. He has won over 300 awards for his work to spread awareness about biodiversity and species conservation. Mike Pandey has dedicated his life to the protection of wild nature through the use of cinematography and for his courage and determination in producing films – with or without sponsorships – that have influenced policy and saved endangered species.

He can be reached at his facebook page or through River Bank Studios website.

We are what we eat and plants give us what we feed – TEDx talk by Ramanjaneyulu GV

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Is our food safe? A red alert question that Ramanjaneyulu, puts out to all of us. Hear him talk about the quality of food we are eating. Listen to the reasons we need to adapt to organic farming as a results of excessive use of chemical pesticides and horrifying facts and statistics, surrounding them. He alerts us to the damage we are doing to our ecological footprints. In his heart wrenching talk, Ramanjaneyulu, highlights the plight of farmers and the reasons they commit suicide and the many reasons that farmers and farming should not die.

“We are what we eat and plants give us what we feed.” He is waging a war against the use of pesticides in agricultural activities and has challenged the traditional methods of farming. Apart from running the Centre for Sustainable Agriculture as the Executive Director, he also runs a small outlet, Sahaja Ahaaram, which stocks pest-free products from farmers. After leaving his full-time government job, Ramanjaneyulu dedicated himself to the benefit of farmers and his campaign, ‘India for Safe Food’.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Credit : http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Poison-on-our-Plate-Ramanjaneyu

5 Tips for Going Green That Will Save You Money – Jessica Kane

Save Money

There are a lot of compelling reasons to live a green lifestyle. For one thing, it protects the planet by conserving resources. Living organically also contributes to good health and can actually save you money. Growing your own food and avoiding processed foods are a couple of money saving ways to live a simpler, healthier life. Many items that we buy at the store, like cleaning and beauty products, can easily be substituted with ingredients available at home. And using solar panels is a great way to save money with clean, renewable energy.

Here are five tips for going green and saving money at the same time:

Grow a Garden

orchard

Having a vegetable garden is a great way to supplement your family’s diet and save money in the process. In the midst of the Great Depression, a lot of people planted ‘kitchen gardens’ to supply fresh produce for their families. In those days, it was a necessity that was often the only alternative to doing without. Growing your own food is just as relevant today. Not only are organically grown vegetables better for you, but the taste of ripe vegetables fresh from the garden is something that can’t be duplicated.

Choose Food Wisely

appleProcessed foods not only cost more than fresh food, but they are actually bad for the environment. They have more packaging and often have to be kept frozen, which uses fossil fuels. Besides, so-called ‘convenience foods’ usually contain more salt and added sugar than necessary, making them an unhealthy alternative. Processed beverages like soda have to be carbonated and bottled at a plant and then trucked to grocery stores, using oil and gas along the way. Cooking at home and making your own lemonade or iced tea is healthier and costs less.

Make Your Own Cleaning Products

Did you know that it’s not really necessary to buy window spray, detergent and other products to clean your house? Vinegar (a natural disinfectant) and baking soda are two cheap products that will tackle just about any cleaning job there is. You can also save a lot of money by making your own laundry detergent with soda, borax and soap. You know that ring around the tub? You don’t need cleanser to get rid of it – baking soda will do the job just as well.

 

Try Do-It-Yourself Beauty Products

skin careIf you really want to save money, stay away from store-bought cosmetics as much as possible. They contain dyes and chemicals, and the price markup on beauty products is ridiculously high. You can still be beautiful, but try replacing some of your beauty products with natural, homemade cosmetics that will save you a bundle. One of the best facial scrubs around is plain cornmeal. It gently exfoliates your skin without leaving any residue, and you don’t have to worry about plastic micro-beads fouling up the environment.

 

 

Embrace Solar Energy

solarSolar energy has been touted for decades as a green alternative to burning fossil fuels. The only problem was that solar panels used to be expensive to purchase and to have installed. Happily, the newest solar panels are more lightweight, easy for a homeowner to install and, most importantly, a lot less expensive. Even if you can’t get off the grid for all of your energy needs, substituting solar power for one hot water heater will add up to a big savings over time.

 

There are so many ways that you can save money by going green, and these five tips are just a few of them. The food and drink we put into our bodies, the cosmetics and lotions we put on our skin and the household cleaners we use in our homes are often easy to make with natural ingredients. And as more solar energy companies are created, new, innovative techniques will keep the idea of going solar a truly cost-effective alternative.

About Author : Jessica Kane is a professional blogger who writes for Econoheat., the world’s #1 leading oil heater manufacturer.

Disclaimer : This article is shared by Author with “Green Ecosystem” voluntarily, free of cost and for the purpose to be shared with everyone for free and Green Ecosystem doesn’t own / reserve any rights of this article, all rights remains with the author (as mentioned above) of this article. Contact info@greenecosystem.in with title of this article if any change.

International days related to Forest, Birds and Wild Life

WMBD

World Wildlife Day – 3 March

World Wildlife Day is an opportunity to celebrate the many beautiful and varied forms of wild fauna and flora and to raise awareness of the multitude of benefits that conservation provides to people. At the same time, the Day reminds us of the urgent need to step up the fight against wildlife crime, which has wide-ranging economic, environmental and social impacts. On 20 December 2013, the Sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly decided to proclaim 3 March as World Wildlife Day to celebrate and raise awareness of the world’s wild fauna and flora. Read More

 

International Day of Forests – 21 March

The United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution A/RES/67/200 on 21 December 2012, which declared that 21 March of each year is to be observed as the International Day of Forests. The International Day of Forests is held annually on 21 March to raise awareness of the importance of forests to people. Forests shelter, nurture and inspire. 1.6 billion people depend on forests for their livelihoods, medicine, fuel and food. Forests cover 31% of global land area. The International Day provides a platform to communicate the vital role forests play in poverty eradication, environmental sustainability and food security. Read More

 

World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) – Second week of May

World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) was initiated in 2006 and is an annual awareness-raising campaign highlighting the need for the conservation of migratory birds and their habitats. Each year, on the second week in May, people around the world take action and organize public events such as bird festivals, education programmes, exhibitions and bird-watching excursions to celebrate WMBD. However, countries or regions observing the peak of migrations at other times of the year are encouraged to celebrate WMBD when it is most appropriate for them. Read More

International Day for Biological Diversity – 22 May

The United Nations General Assembly, by its resolution 55/201 of 20 December 2000, proclaimed 22 May as The International Day for Biological Diversity, to increase understanding and awareness of biodiversity issues. Biological diversity — or biodiversity — is the term given to the variety of life on Earth and the natural patterns it forms. The biodiversity we see today is the fruit of billions of years of evolution, shaped by natural processes and, increasingly, by the influence of humans. It forms the web of life of which we are an integral part and upon which we so fully depend. This diversity is often understood in terms of the wide variety of plants, animals and microorganisms. Read More

 

World Habitat Day – First Monday of October

In 1985 the United Nations designated the first Monday of October every year as World Habitat Day. The idea is to reflect on the state of our towns and cities and the basic right of all to adequate shelter. It is also intended to remind the world of its collective responsibility for the future of the human habitat. Read More

 

World Elephant Day – 12 August

On August 12, 2012, the inaugural World Elephant Day was launched to bring attention to the urgent plight of Asian and African elephants. The elephant is loved, revered and respected by people and cultures around the world, yet we balance on the brink of seeing the last of this magnificent creature. World Elephant Day asks you to experience elephants in non-exploitive and sustainable environments where elephants can thrive under care and protection. On World Elephant Day, August 12, express your concern, share your knowledge and support solutions for the better care of captive and wild elephants alike.
Check Official Website of World Elephant day.

International days related to Ocean, Meteorology and Water Conservation

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World Water Day – 22 March

International World Water Day is held annually on 22 March as a means of focusing attention on the importance of freshwater and advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources. An international day to celebrate freshwater was recommended at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro. The United Nations General Assembly responded by designating 22 March 1993 as the first World Water Day. Read More and unwater.org/worldwaterday

 

World Meteorological Day – 23 March

World Meteorological Day is an occasion to highlight the work that National Meteorological and Hydrological Services accomplish 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to watch the weather and protect life and property. Read More

 

World Oceans Day – 8 June

By its resolution 63/111 of 5 December 2008, the UN General Assembly designated 8 June as World Oceans Day. The concept of a ‘World Oceans Day’ was first proposed in 1992 at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro as a way to celebrate our world’s shared ocean and our personal connection to the sea, as well as to raise awareness about the crucial role the ocean plays in our lives and the important ways people can help protect it. Read More

World Day of the Seafarer – 25 June

Seafarers are the people without whom food, clothes, gifts, gadgets or even basic needs would not reach our doors. We rely on them every day. In 2010, the Diplomatic Conference which met in Manila to adopt milestone revisions to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (the STCW Convention) and its associated Code, also agreed that the unique contribution made by seafarers from all over the world to international seaborne trade, the world economy and civil society as a whole, should be marked annually with a ‘Day of the Seafarer’. The date chosen was 25 June, the day on which the amendments were formally adopted. Read More

 

World Maritime Day – 29 September
World Maritime Day is an occasion to focus attention, on the wider spectrum of maritime education and training, in particular its adequacy and quality, as the bedrock of a safe and secure shipping industry, which needs to preserve the quality, practical skills and competence of qualified human resources, in order to ensure its sustainability. Read More

 

 

 

International days related to Environment

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World Environment Day (WED) –  5 June

World Environment Day (WED) is the United Nations’ principal vehicle for encouraging worldwide awareness and action for the environment. Over the years it has grown to be a broad, global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated by stakeholders in over 100 countries. It also serves as the ‘people’s day’ for doing something positive for the environment, galvanizing individual actions into a collective power that generates an exponential positive impact on the planet. – Read More

 

International Mother Earth Day – 22 April

International Mother Earth Day promotes a view of the Earth as the entity that sustains all living things found in nature. It honors the Earth as a whole and our place within it. It does not seek to replace other events, such as Earth Day, which has been celebrated by many people around the world on 22 March since the 1970s, but rather to reinforce and reinterpret them based on the evolving challenges we face. Read More

International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer – 16 September

In 1994, the UN General Assembly proclaimed 16 September the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer, commemorating the date of the signing, in 1987, of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (resolution 49/114). The ozone layer, a fragile shield of gas, protects the Earth from the harmful portion of the rays of the sun, thus helping preserve life on the planet. Read More

 

International Day for Preventing the Exploitation of the Environment in War and Armed Conflict ( Environment Conflict Day ) – 6 November

On 5 November 2001, the UN General Assembly declared 6 November of each year as the International Day for Preventing the Exploitation of the Environment in War and Armed Conflict (A/RES/56/4). Though mankind has always counted its war casualties in terms of dead and wounded soldiers and civilians, destroyed cities and livelihoods, the environment has often remained the unpublicized victim of war.Water wells have been polluted, crops torched, forests cut down, soils poisoned, and animals killed to gain military advantage. Read More